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Which was the most important result of silk road trade

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Which was the most important effect of trade along the Silk Road Brainly?

An important result of the trade of many goods on the Silk Road was the exchange of inventions and ideas.

Who was the Silk Road important?

Because silk was the major trade product which traveled on this road, it was named the Silk Road in 1877 by Ferdinand von Richthofen – a well-known German geographer. This ancient route not only circulated goods, but also exchanged the splendid cultures of China, India, Persia, Arabia, Greek and Rome.

Was the Silk Road useful for trade?

The Silk Road was a network of trade routes connecting China and the Far East with the Middle East and Europe. … Although it’s been nearly 600 years since the Silk Road has been used for international trade, the routes had a lasting impact on commerce, culture and history that resonates even today.

What ideas came from the Silk Road?

Chinese Technologies Introduced into the West via Silk Road

The Chinese Four Great Inventions (paper making, printing, gunpowder and compass) as well as the skills of silkworm breeding and silk spinning were transmitted to the West. This greatly sped up the development of the entire world.20 мая 2020 г.

How does the silk road affect us today?

How does the Silk Road affect us today? Many items we use every day would be unavailable to us if not for Silk Road trade. At its height during the Tang (tahng) Dynasty (618-907 CE), over 1,000 years ago, the Silk Road gave passage to raw materials and finished goods, but also to ideas, inventions, and religions.

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What was one effect of the Silk Road on China?

The Silk Road created a monopoly for Chinese trade. The Silk road promoted the exchange of goods and ideas throughout China.

Why is the Silk Road so important?

The Silk Road was important because it helped to generate trade and commerce between a number of different kingdoms and empires. This helped for ideas, culture, inventions, and unique products to spread across much of the settled world.

How the Silk Road changed the world?

Cultural and religious exchanges began to meander along the route, acting as a connection for a global network where East and West ideologies met. … Additionally Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism and Nestorianism were all introduced to China and parts of India because of the Silk Roads influence.

Who invented silk?

According to Chinese myth, sericulture and the weaving of silk cloth was invented by Lady Hsi-Ling-Shih, the wife of the mythical Yellow Emperor who is said to have ruled China in about 3,000 BC. Hsi-Ling-Shi is credited with both introducing sericulture and inventing the loom upon which silk is woven.

How did the Silk Road affect the economy?

Ancient Chinese trading had a huge influence on the economy. One of the largest trading routes of China was the Silk Road. Many different commodities were transported on the silk road such as, tea, Chinese money, salt, iron, spices, sugar, porcelain, cotton, ivory, wool, gold and silver.

What is Silk Route and its importance?

The Silk Route was a series of ancient trade networks that connected China and the Far East with countries in Europe and the Middle East. The route included a group of trading posts and markets that were used to help in the storage, transport, and exchange of goods. It was also known as the Silk Road.

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Why did the Silk Road end?

The speed of the sea transportation, the possibility to carry more goods, relative cheapness of transportation resulted in the decline of the Silk Road in the end of the 15th century. … During the civil war in China the destroyed Silk Road once again played its big role in the history of China.

What was the most dangerous section of the Silk Roads?

Gansu Corridor

What diseases did the Silk Road spread?

The Silk Road has often been blamed for the spread of infectious diseases such as bubonic plague, leprosy and anthrax by travellers between East Asia, the Middle East and Europe (Monot et al., 2009, Schmid et al., 2015, Simonson et al., 2009).

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