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What were the triangular trade routes

Trade

What are the three parts of the triangle trade?

On the first leg of their three-part journey, often called the Triangular Trade, European ships brought manufactured goods, weapons, even liquor to Africa in exchange for slaves; on the second, they transported African men, women, and children to the Americas to serve as slaves; and on the third leg, they exported to …

When was the triangular trade route?

during the late 16th to early 19th centuries, carrying slaves, cash crops, and manufactured goods between West Africa, Caribbean or American colonies and the European colonial powers, with the northern colonies of British North America, especially New England, sometimes taking over the role of Europe.

Which leg of the triangular trade routes was the longest?

middle passage

What is the mother country in the triangular trade?

England

What started the triangular trade?

The triangular trade

The slave trade began with Portuguese (and some Spanish) traders, taking mainly enslaved West African (and some Central African) people to the American colonies they had conquered in the 15th century.

How did triangular trade change the world?

The slave labor supplied to the colonies allowed for the proliferation of plantations, which in turn helped with the growth and prosperity of the New World. The triangular trade brought new crops and goods to Africa.

Who benefited the most from the triangular trade?

New England. New England also benefited from the trade, as many merchants from New England, especially the state of Rhode Island, replaced the role of Europe in the triangle. New England also made rum from Caribbean sugar and molasses, which it shipped to Africa as well as within the New World.

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What does triangular trade mean?

a pattern of colonial commerce connecting three regions and crossing the Atlantic Ocean, specifically the transporting of enslaved Africans to the Americas, cotton and other raw materials from the Americas to Europe, and textiles and other manufactured goods from Europe to West Africa, or a similar repeating trade …

How did the triangular trade affect Africa?

The size of the Atlantic slave trade dramatically transformed African societies. The slave trade brought about a negative impact on African societies and led to the long-term impoverishment of West Africa. This intensified effects that were already present amongst its rulers, kinships, kingdoms and in society.

What was the last leg of the triangular trade?

The second stage of the Triangular Trade, The Middle Passage, involved shipping the slaves to the Americas. The third, and final, stage of the Triangular Trade involved the return to Europe with the produce from the slave-labor plantations: cotton, sugar, tobacco, molasses and rum.

What was the second leg of the triangular trade known as?

In both patterns, the second leg of the triangle became known as the infamous “middle passage” in which enslaved Africans were carried to destinations in the Americas, usually islands in the West Indies, but in some instances locations on the North American mainland, especially Charleston, South Carolina.

How were slaves captured in Africa?

Most slaves in Africa were captured in wars or in surprise raids on villages. Adults were bound and gagged and infants were sometimes thrown into sacks.

What did Europe bring to Africa?

There they were exchanged for iron, guns, gunpowder, mirrors, knives, cloth, and beads brought by boat from Europe. When Europeans arrived along the West African coast, slavery already existed on the continent.

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How does the triangular trade relate to mercantilism?

The triangular trade was linked to the economic theory of mercantilism. This was the idea that a country builds wealth by exporting more goods than it imports. With this wealth comes power. … Colonies supplied their parent nation with raw materials that were used to produce finished goods.

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