A forward trade is any trade that settles further in the future than spot. The forward price is a combination of the spot rate plus or minus forward points that represent the interest rate differential between the two currencies. Most have a maturity less than a year in the future but longer is possible. Like with a spot, the price is set on the transaction date, but money is exchanged on the maturity date.


Inflation levels and trends: Typically a currency will lose value if there is a high level of inflation in the country or if inflation levels are perceived to be rising. This is because inflation erodes purchasing power, thus demand, for that particular currency. However, a currency may sometimes strengthen when inflation rises because of expectations that the central bank will raise short-term interest rates to combat rising inflation.
A swap trade involves both. Dealers buy a currency at today's price on the spot market and sell the same amount in the forward market. This way, they have just limited their risk in the future. No matter how much the currency falls, they will not lose more than the forward price. Meanwhile, they can invest the currency they bought on the spot market.

Use leverage wisely: As we've already mentioned, Forex CFDs allow you to trade on a margin, or by using leverage. However, just because 1:30 (or 1:500) leverage is available, it doesn't mean that you need to use it. At Admiral Markets, while there is a maximum amount of leverage available to our clients, they are still able to choose the amount of leverage they use when they are trading, which may be anything up to that amount.


You may also request a bonus to get the best deal for your deposit (Applicable only for clients who are categorised as a "Professional client"). Admiral Markets provides market leading spreads together with low commissions. All of the trading accounts available with Admiral Markets are suitable for day trading, and arguably provide a high-quality experience, for beginner traders and professionals alike.

Counter trend trading refers to a type of reversal trading of the important historical/now moment support or resistance level, and some professional FX traders trade it when the price overshots the ATR (14) – going considerably below or above the projected levels. It can also be a form of EOD (End Of Day) trading. Profits are usually taken close to the Fibonacci retracement levels, as counter trending always starts with a retracement first. So, by using different intraday trading approaches, you will have a plethora of tools to use and profit from the market movement.


The value of a country's currency depends on whether it is a "free float" or "fixed float". Free floating currencies are those whose relative value is determined by free market forces, such as supply / demand relationships. A fixed float is where a country's governing body sets its currency's relative value to other currencies, often by pegging it to some standard. Free floating currencies include the U.S. Dollar, Japanese Yen and British Pound, while examples of fixed floating currencies include the Chinese Yuan and the Indian Rupee.
It is estimated that in the UK, 14% of currency transfers/payments are made via Foreign Exchange Companies.[65] These companies' selling point is usually that they will offer better exchange rates or cheaper payments than the customer's bank.[66] These companies differ from Money Transfer/Remittance Companies in that they generally offer higher-value services. The volume of transactions done through Foreign Exchange Companies in India amounts to about US$2 billion[67] per day This does not compete favorably with any well developed foreign exchange market of international repute, but with the entry of online Foreign Exchange Companies the market is steadily growing. Around 25% of currency transfers/payments in India are made via non-bank Foreign Exchange Companies.[68] Most of these companies use the USP of better exchange rates than the banks. They are regulated by FEDAI and any transaction in foreign Exchange is governed by the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999 (FEMA).
The foreign exchange market is where currencies are traded. Currencies are important to most people around the world, whether they realize it or not, because currencies need to be exchanged in order to conduct foreign trade and business. If you are living in the U.S. and want to buy cheese from France, either you or the company that you buy the cheese from has to pay the French for the cheese in euros (EUR). This means that the U.S. importer would have to exchange the equivalent value of U.S. dollars (USD) into euros. The same goes for traveling. A French tourist in Egypt can't pay in euros to see the pyramids because it's not the locally accepted currency. As such, the tourist has to exchange the euros for the local currency, in this case the Egyptian pound, at the current exchange rate.
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