Big news comes in and then the market starts to spike or plummets rapidly. At this point it may be tempting to jump on the easy-money train, however, doing so without a disciplined trading plan behind you can be just as damaging as gambling before the news comes out. This is because illiquidity and sharp price movements mean a trade can quickly translate into significant losses as large swings take place or ‘whipsaw’.
One has to adopt one or many strategies in order to minimise losses and maximise profits. As market conditions vary from day to day, so should a day trader's strategy. A successful day trader has to come up with a new strategy almost every other day, or at least adjust their existing strategy to the new market conditions. In order to day trade Forex successfully, a creative mind is needed.

Understand your risk tolerance: Every person has a different level of risk tolerance, and this will influence the size of the chances they take, the losses they are willing to experience, and the psychological effect of them. To manage your stress levels while trading, it's important to consider your level of risk tolerance in advance, and choose trading strategies that support this. 

In every part of life, discipline is important, but neglecting discipline in day trading may potentially result in huge losses. Success without discipline is practically impossible. You need to be able to monitor prices for extended periods of time without making any rash trading decisions. This is hard and requires lots of discipline. Sometimes seeing profitable market moves that you have predicted but did not execute is painful, yet it is better to waste an opportunity, than to guarantee a loss.
A forward trade is any trade that settles further in the future than spot. The forward price is a combination of the spot rate plus or minus forward points that represent the interest rate differential between the two currencies. Most have a maturity less than a year in the future but longer is possible. Like with a spot, the price is set on the transaction date, but money is exchanged on the maturity date.
To use an extreme example, imagine holding an account balance of 2,000 EUR and putting all of that on a single trade. If the trade goes badly, you will have lost your entire investment, and because the Forex market can move very quickly, losses can also happen very quickly. This is where risk management is essential - to help you minimise losses and protect any profits you do make. The key areas to consider when managing your Forex trading risk are trading psychology, and money management.
This material does not contain and should not be construed as containing investment advice, investment recommendations, an offer of or solicitation for any transactions in financial instruments. Please note that such trading analysis is not a reliable indicator for any current or future performance, as circumstances may change over time. Before making any investment decisions, you should seek advice from independent financial advisors to ensure you understand the risks.
For instance, if you opened a long trade on the GBP/USD currency pair, and the pair increased in value, the price limit at which the trade should close (the stop loss) would climb alongside the price of the currency pair. If the value of the GBP/USD then started to fall, the trade would be closed as soon as it hit your stop loss, preserving any profits you had made beforehand.
Analysis is absolutely vital to trading. Charts are helpful for both short and long-term trading. You should be looking at daily, weekly, and monthly charts. Fortunately, there are a number of different approaches to Forex analysis, which means every trader can find the right approach for them. The three broad categories of Forex analysis are fundamental analysis, technical analysis and wave analysis.

There are actually three ways that institutions, corporations and individuals trade forex: the spot market, the forwards market and the futures market. The forex trading in the spot market always has been the largest market because it is the "underlying" real asset that the forwards and futures markets are based on. In the past, the futures market was the most popular venue for traders because it was available to individual investors for a longer period of time. However, with the advent of electronic trading and numerous forex brokers, the spot market has witnessed a huge surge in activity and now surpasses the futures market as the preferred trading market for individual investors and speculators. When people refer to the forex market, they usually are referring to the spot market. The forwards and futures markets tend to be more popular with companies that need to hedge their foreign exchange risks out to a specific date in the future.
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