The modern foreign exchange market began forming during the 1970s. This followed three decades of government restrictions on foreign exchange transactions under the Bretton Woods system of monetary management, which set out the rules for commercial and financial relations among the world's major industrial states after World War II. Countries gradually switched to floating exchange rates from the previous exchange rate regime, which remained fixed per the Bretton Woods system.
In a short setup, the market needs to be trading below the 21 EMA first. As the market retraces back to the moving average, day traders may be anticipating a turn lower from it. Therefore, if a seller bar forms on the moving average it could be a sign of further selling momentum. However, a stop loss is always used to minimise losses in case the market turns the other way.

In 1876, something called the gold exchange standard was implemented. Basically it said that all paper currency had to be backed by solid gold; the idea here was to stabilize world currencies by pegging them to the price of gold. It was a good idea in theory, but in reality it created boom-bust patterns which ultimately led to the demise of the gold standard.


The EUR/USD pair is closing a second consecutive week with gains at around 1.1070, retreating from a high at 1.1109. A scarce macroeconomic calendar kept the pair in a dull range during the first half of the week, also the wait and see stance ahead of the ECB monetary policy decision on Thursday. One done, one to go, as the US Federal Reserve will be announcing its decision on monetary policy next Wednesday, September 18.
The foreign exchange market is an over-the-counter (OTC) marketplace that determines the exchange rate for global currencies. Participants are able to buy, sell, exchange and speculate on currencies. Foreign exchange markets are made up of banks, forex dealers, commercial companies, central banks, investment management firms, hedge funds, retail forex dealers and investors.
This is quite a nice strategy for traders that have a lot of time at their disposal. Trading breakouts can be a great day trading strategy too. With this strategy you are patiently waiting for big market moves, usually caused by the various changes in the relevant country's economies. Such changes are delivered either unexpectedly or via expected news releases. During breakout trading, a trader opens a position in the forecasted direction, and waits for the currency pair to escalate (or slump) by a large amount of pips.

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If you're day trading a currency pair like the GBP/USD, you can risk $50 on each trade, and each pip of movement is worth $10 with a standard lot (100,000 units worth of currency). Therefore you can take a position of one standard lot with a 5-pip stop-loss order, which will keep the risk of loss to $50 on the trade. That also means a winning trade is worth $80 (8 pips x $10).
Many people question what a trader’s salary is. However, the truth is it varies hugely. The majority of people will struggle to turn a profit and eventually give up. On the other hand, a small minority prove not only that it is possible to turn a profit, but that you can also make huge returns. So it is possible to make money trading forex, but there are no guarantees. 75-80% of retail traders lose money.
Trading in South Africa might be safest with an FSA regulated (or registered) brand. The regions classed as ‘unregulated’ by European brokers see way less ‘default’ protection. So a local regulator can give additional confidence. This is similar in Singapore, the Philippines or Hong Kong. The choice of ‘best forex broker’ will therefore differ region by region.
^ The total sum is 200% because each currency trade always involves a currency pair; one currency is sold (e.g. US$) and another bought (€). Therefore each trade is counted twice, once under the sold currency ($) and once under the bought currency (€). The percentages above are the percent of trades involving that currency regardless of whether it is bought or sold, e.g. the U.S. Dollar is bought or sold in 88% of all trades, whereas the Euro is bought or sold 32% of the time.
Secondly, a larger return is needed on your remaining capital to retrieve any lost capital from the initial losing trade. If a trader loses 50% of their capital, it will take a 100% return to bring them back to the original capital level. Losing large chunks of money on single trades or on single days of trading can cripple capital growth for long periods of time.
The modern foreign exchange market began forming during the 1970s. This followed three decades of government restrictions on foreign exchange transactions under the Bretton Woods system of monetary management, which set out the rules for commercial and financial relations among the world's major industrial states after World War II. Countries gradually switched to floating exchange rates from the previous exchange rate regime, which remained fixed per the Bretton Woods system.

The foreign exchange market is where currencies are traded. Currencies are important to most people around the world, whether they realize it or not, because currencies need to be exchanged in order to conduct foreign trade and business. If you are living in the U.S. and want to buy cheese from France, either you or the company that you buy the cheese from has to pay the French for the cheese in euros (EUR). This means that the U.S. importer would have to exchange the equivalent value of U.S. dollars (USD) into euros. The same goes for traveling. A French tourist in Egypt can't pay in euros to see the pyramids because it's not the locally accepted currency. As such, the tourist has to exchange the euros for the local currency, in this case the Egyptian pound, at the current exchange rate.
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