When it comes to averaging down, traders must not add to positions, but rather sell losers quickly with a pre-planned exit strategy. Additionally, traders should sit back and watch news announcements until their resulting volatility has subsided. Risk must also be kept in check at all times, with no single trade or day losing more than what can be easily made back on another.
According to the Bank for International Settlements, the preliminary global results from the 2019 Triennial Central Bank Survey of Foreign Exchange and OTC Derivatives Markets Activity show that trading in foreign exchange markets averaged $6.6 trillion per day in April 2019. This is up from $5.1 trillion in April 2016. Measured by value, foreign exchange swaps were traded more than any other instrument in April 2019, at $3.2 trillion per day, followed by spot trading at $2 trillion.[3]

Italiano: Investire nel Forex Online, Español: invertir en Forex, Português: Negociar Forex Online, Français: trader sur le marché de devises en ligne, 中文: 在网上进行外汇交易, Русский: торговать на форексе, Deutsch: Online mit Devisen handeln, Bahasa Indonesia: Berdagang Valas, Čeština: Jak obchodovat na forexovém trhu, العربية: تداول الفوركس, Tiếng Việt: Giao dịch Forex, Nederlands: In vreemde valuta handelen


Automated Forex trades could enhance your returns if you have developed a consistently effective strategy. This is because instead of manually entering a trade, an algorithm or bot will automatically enter and exit positions once pre-determined criteria have been met. In addition, there is often no minimum account balance required to set up an automated system.

Swing trading: Swing trading is a medium-term trading approach that focuses on larger price movements than scalping or intraday trading. This means that traders can set up a trade and check in on it within a few hours, or a few days, rather than having to constantly sit in front of their trading platform, making it a good option for people trading alongside a day job.
International parity conditions: Relative purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, Domestic Fisher effect, International Fisher effect. Though to some extent the above theories provide logical explanation for the fluctuations in exchange rates, yet these theories falter as they are based on challengeable assumptions [e.g., free flow of goods, services and capital] which seldom hold true in the real world.

More specifically, the spot market is where currencies are bought and sold according to the current price. That price, determined by supply and demand, is a reflection of many things, including current interest rates, economic performance, sentiment towards ongoing political situations (both locally and internationally), as well as the perception of the future performance of one currency against another. When a deal is finalized, this is known as a "spot deal". It is a bilateral transaction by which one party delivers an agreed-upon currency amount to the counter party and receives a specified amount of another currency at the agreed-upon exchange rate value. After a position is closed, the settlement is in cash. Although the spot market is commonly known as one that deals with transactions in the present (rather than the future), these trades actually take two days for settlement.
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