By shorting €100,000, the trader took in $115,000 for the short-sale. When the euro fell, and the trader covered their short, it cost the trader only $110,000 to repurchase the currency. The difference between the money received on the short-sale and the buy to cover is the profit. Had the euro strengthened versus the dollar, it would have resulted in a loss.
Much can be said of unrealistic expectations, which come from many sources, but often result in all of the above problems. Our own trading expectations are often imposed on the market, yet we cannot expect it to act according our desires. Put simply, the market doesn't care about individual desires and traders must accept that the market can be choppy, volatile and trending all in short-, medium- and long-term cycles. There is no tried-and-true method for isolating each move and profiting, and believing so will result in frustration and errors in judgment.
The foreign exchange market is where currencies are traded. Currencies are important to most people around the world, whether they realize it or not, because currencies need to be exchanged in order to conduct foreign trade and business. If you are living in the U.S. and want to buy cheese from France, either you or the company that you buy the cheese from has to pay the French for the cheese in euros (EUR). This means that the U.S. importer would have to exchange the equivalent value of U.S. dollars (USD) into euros. The same goes for traveling. A French tourist in Egypt can't pay in euros to see the pyramids because it's not the locally accepted currency. As such, the tourist has to exchange the euros for the local currency, in this case the Egyptian pound, at the current exchange rate.
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